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Thursday, November 14 • 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Risk, Uncertainty, Unknowns, and Nonsense - Engagement with the Public on Radiation, Nuclear, and Climate (40 min) / Risques, incertitudes, inconnus et absurdités - Engagement avec le public sur la radiation, le nucléaire et le climat

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Panel Organized by: The Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) | Johnson
Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy (University of Regina campus)

The connection between policymakers, scientists and the public is essential in advancing innovative technology and policy to solve complex problems including climate change, energy justice, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and to keep workers and the public safe from exposure to low dose radiation. Refusal to accept low dose radiation health interventions such as Xrays and cancer treatments, to rejection of new innovative technologies, such as small modular nuclear reactors are but a few examples of the spectrum of uncertainty, unknowns and nonsense. New science challenges the current linear toxicity paradigm and more research is required; the most important research is how values and risks are understood, characterized, constructed, and communicated by the public, Indigenous peoples, and health professionals.

It is assumed that exposure to radiation can only be detrimental and the health risks resulting from exposures are linearly proportional to harm. Given the uncertainty, and some recent evidence to suggest that the current low dose, toxicity paradigm may be in error, it is widely recognized that research is required to address the consequences of exposures to LDR and to reduce uncertainties. This collaborative interactive session tackles the wicked problem of risk and policymaking, focusing specifically on perceptions of low dose radiation in relation to medical treatments and new innovative technologies such as small modular nuclear reactors. Questions concern how risks are understood, characterized, and constructed by the public (as often neglected but most important actors in assessing and making decisions about risk)? What about Indigenous knowledge and worldviews? How can expert-based organizations better grapple with and understand the role of values in shaping the public’s perception of LDR? Can a better understanding of value differences help shape policies about acceptable risk thresholds and appropriate strategies for communicating and mitigating risk?


Moderators
avatar for Margot Hurlbert

Margot Hurlbert

Tier 1, Canada Research Chair, Climate Change, Energy and Sustainability Policy, Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina
Prof. Margot Hurlbert, Tier 1, Canada Research Chair, Climate Change, Energy and Sustainability Policy, Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina. Margot has lead research projects, authored numerous... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anne T. Ballantyne

Anne T. Ballantyne

Strategic Research Planning and Facilitation Officer, Office of the Vice-Dean Research, Scholarly and Artistic Work, College of Arts and Science, University of Saskatchewan
Anne T. Ballantyne, BSc, BA, MBA, is the Strategic Research Planning and Facilitation Officer, Office of theVice-Dean Research, Scholarly and Artistic Work, College of Arts and Science, at the University of Saskatchewan. For nearly thirty years Anne has led, designed and implemented... Read More →
avatar for Larissa Shasko

Larissa Shasko

MPP Candidate, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
Larissa Shasko, is currently a Master's of Public Policy Candidate, Centre for Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) and Robertson Scholar, at the Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy (JSGS), University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Her Thesis research areas include... Read More →
avatar for Michaela Neetz

Michaela Neetz

MPP Candidate, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
Michaela Neetz is an MPP candidate at the Johnson Shoyama Graduate School and a Centre for Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) Scholar, at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. She has a BSc. majoring in geophysics from the University of British Columbia... Read More →
avatar for Holly Laasko

Holly Laasko

Holly Laakso, PhD, BMSc, received her PhD in Microbiology & Immunology from Western University of Ontario. Holly started her postdoctoral fellowship in the Radiobiology & Health branch at Canadian Nuclear Laboratories in Chalk River, in August of 2018.  Holly is currently working on the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on cancer progression using a mouse model... Read More →
HS

Horratio Sam-Aggrey

Research Assistant, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
avatar for Dimtry Klokov

Dimtry Klokov

Head, Radiobiology and Health, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) and Adjunct Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, University of Ottawa
Dr. Dimtry Klokov, Head, Radiobiology and Health, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) and Adjunct Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa. Dr. Klokov has been leading the Section of Radiobiology at Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (formerly... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 2

Attendees (1)